Integrating Quotes Assignment

Due: February 17

There are a variety of documentation styles. We’ll use MLA (Modern Language Association) style in our class.  In the social sciences and many professional programs you’ll use something called APA (American Psychological Association).  Historians often use CMS (Chicago Manual of Style). No matter the style, you need to have the same basic information when you’re working with sources.

MLA citation style has 3 key elements

  • Name of the author in the text (often with something called a “signal phrase” that helps transition the reader into the quote).
  • The specific page number for the quote or reference.
  • A list of references called “Works Cited” that appears at the end of the paper.

Your Task

  1. In MLA-3a, Hacker tells us about the ellipsis mark and brackets.
    • Find two quotes in your draft.  Write those sentences.
    • Now rewrite one with an ellipsis mark and one with a bracket.  What do these tools enable you to do when you’re integrating quotes?
  2. Signal phrasing enables us to weave our work with others’ texts into our papers. It helps introduce others’ ideas or information, and helps the reader know what’s coming.
    • Find two quotes in your draft. Make sure one comes from each author we’re working with. Write the quotes.
    • Now, revise each quote to include effective signal phrasing. (Our Templates can also help.)
  3. In-text citation may seem like a pain in the @$$. But it is vitally important in academic contexts because it helps the reader see where your material comes from. (Sloppiness here leaves the reader skeptical about your work.)
    • Take each of your four revised sentences with quotations and revise again for appropriate MLA in-text citation.
    • For at least one sentence, try to cite without naming the author in a signal phrase. Why might you not use a signal phrase sometimes?
  4. Long quotes are handled a little differently (Hacker 381-2). Take one of your quotes and expand it to make it a long quote. Cite it and explain how you had to change some of the elements of the citation.
  5. Using MLA-4b in Hacker, try to identify just what kinds of sources we’re dealing with in paper 1. Why do you think they fit the type you have chosen? Attempt a Works Cited list that includes these two sources. (Use this as the opportunity to get it right for the final draft!)

9 thoughts on “Integrating Quotes Assignment

  1. 1. –Before: According to Rose, “Indeed, there are exceptional, underground songs and voices in hip hop (tokenized on commercial radio airplay and marginalized on music video rotation) that deal with a wider range of elements of black inner-city poverty and everyday life” (Rose 140)
    –After: According to Rose, “Indeed, there are exceptional, underground songs and voices in hip hop…that deal with a wider range of elements of black inner-city poverty and everyday life” (Rose 140)
    –Before: “Corporate record companies, while claiming to be mere middle-men distributors of authentic black ghetto tale, are product makers, and they really do steer public attention toward and away from ideas and images” (Rose 143)
    –After: “Corporate record companies, while claiming to be mere middle-men distributors of authentic black ghetto tale, are product makers, and they really do steer public attention toward and away from ideas and images [that aren't profitable]” (Rose 143)
    –Ellipses help to shorten quotes so they are clear and concise. Brackets help to make quotes clearer and easier to understand.

    2. –Before: According to Rose, “if black ghetto street life were really being represented, we’d hear far more rhymes about homelessness and the terrible intergenerational effects of drug addiction. There would be much more urban contemporary radio play of songs about fear and loss, and real talk about incarceration” (Rose 139)
    –After: Rose argues that, “if black ghetto street life were really being represented, we’d hear far more rhymes about homelessness and the terrible intergenerational effects of drug addiction. There would be much more urban contemporary radio play of songs about fear and loss, and real talk about incarceration” (Rose 139)
    –Before: According to Rose, “by letting commercial hip hop become a nearly constant caricature of gangstas, pimps, and hoes, we’ve come to equate black poverty with black street life” (Rose 139)
    –After: In Rose’s opinion, “by letting commercial hip hop become a nearly constant caricature of gangstas, pimps, and hoes, we’ve come to equate black poverty with black street life” (Rose 139)

    3. –Before: According to Rose, “Indeed, there are exceptional, underground songs and voices in hip hop…that deal with a wider range of elements of black inner-city poverty and everyday life” (Rose 140)
    –After: Many people would argue that, “Indeed, there are exceptional, underground songs and voices in hip hop…that deal with a wider range of elements of black inner-city poverty and everyday life” (Rose 140).
    –Before: According to Rose, “Corporate record companies, while claiming to be mere middle-men distributors of authentic black ghetto tale, are product makers, and they really do steer public attention toward and away from ideas and images [that aren't profitable]” (Rose 143)
    –After: According to Rose, “Corporate record companies, while claiming to be mere middle-men distributors of authentic black ghetto tale, are product makers, and they really do steer public attention toward and away from ideas and images [that aren't profitable]” (143).
    –Before: Rose argues that, “if black ghetto street life were really being represented, we’d hear far more rhymes about homelessness and the terrible intergenerational effects of drug addiction. There would be much more urban contemporary radio play of songs about fear and loss, and real talk about incarceration” (Rose 139)
    –After: Rose argues that, “if black ghetto street life were really being represented, we’d hear far more rhymes about homelessness and the terrible intergenerational effects of drug addiction. There would be much more urban contemporary radio play of songs about fear and loss, and real talk about incarceration” (139).
    –Before: In Rose’s opinion, “by letting commercial hip hop become a nearly constant caricature of gangstas, pimps, and hoes, we’ve come to equate black poverty with black street life” (Rose 139)
    –After: In Rose’s opinion, “by letting commercial hip hop become a nearly constant caricature of gangstas, pimps, and hoes, we’ve come to equate black poverty with black street life” (139).

    4. –Before: Scott defines the hidden transcript as “discourse that takes place ‘offstage,’ beyond direct observation by powerholders” (Scott 4).
    –After: Scott defines his idea of the term hidden transcript:
    I shall use the term ‘hidden transcript’ to characterize discourse that takes place ‘offstage,’ beyond direct observation by powerholders. The hidden transcript is thus derivative in the sense that it consists of those offstage speeches, gestures, and practices that confirm, contradict, or inflect what appears in the public transcript…the hidden transcript is produced for a different audience and under different constraints of power than the public transcript. (4-5)
    –The parentheses citing the page number go outside the punctuation instead of inside. There are no quotation marks. The entire quote is indented.

    5. –The sources are “basic format for a book.” Both Rose and Scott’s texts are books in print with no editors.

    Rose, Tricia. The Hip Hop Wars: What We Talk about When We Talk about Hip Hop–and Why It Matters. New York: Basic Civitas, 2008. Print.
    Scott, James C. Domination and the Arts of Resistance: Hidden Transcripts. New Haven: Yale UP, 1990. Print.

  2. 1.) Rose believes that if it was true hip hop; “If black ghetto street life were really being represented, we’d hear far more rhymes about homelessness and the terrible intergenerational effects of drug addiction” (Rose, 139).
    Re-write Rose believes that if it was true hip hop, “…we’d hear far more rhymes about homelessness and the terrible intergenerational effect of drug addiction” (139).
    “And my whole life, every white man’s life in the East, was one long struggle not to be laughed at” (Scott, 11).
    Re-write “And my whole life, every white man’s life in the East [referring to the dominant group], was one long struggle not to be laughed at [by the subordinates] (Scott, 11).
    This tool enables us to be able to make our point more clear, either by skipping parts of the quote to get right to the point or to add words to make a better understanding of the quote.

    2.) James Scott’s take on hidden transcript; “I shall use the term hidden transcript to characterize discourse that takes place ‘offstage,’ beyond direct observation by powerholders” (4).
    According to both Rose and Scott, “I shall use the term hidden transcript to characterize discourse that takes place ‘offstage,’ beyond direct observation by powerholders” (Scott, 4).
    “A good deal of hip hop speaks and has always spoken openly and in depth about aspects of black urban poverty” (Rose, 135).
    Rose argues “A good deal of hip hop speaks and has always spoken openly and in depth about aspects of black urban poverty” (135).

    3.)Four revised sentences
    Rose believes that if it was true hip hop, “…we’d hear far more rhymes about homelessness and the terrible intergenerational effect of drug addiction” (139).

    “And my whole life, every white man’s life in the East [referring to the dominant group], was one long struggle not to be laughed at [by the subordinates]” (Scott, 11).

    According to both Rose and Scott, “I shall use the term hidden transcript to characterize discourse that takes place ‘offstage,’ beyond direct observation by powerholders” (Scott, 4).

    Rose argues “A good deal of hip hop speaks and has always spoken openly and in depth about aspects of black urban poverty” (135).
    “A good deal of hip hop speaks and has always spoken openly and in depth about aspects of black urban poverty” (Rose, 135).
    You might not use a signal phrase sometimes, because you already discussed the quote the sentence before or for effect purposes.

    4.) “A good deal of hip hop speaks and has always spoken openly and in depth about aspects of black urban poverty” (Rose, 135).
    To expand this quote I would need a sentence to introduce to passage and end it with a semi colon. I would always take away the quotation marks, and take away Rose’s name at the end of citing it since I introduced the passage.

    5.) We are dealing with single author and book (print). These too sources fit to Rose and Scott’s work because they are both authors of their books.
    Work Cited
    Scott, James. “Behind the Official Story.”Domination and The Arts of Resistance: Hidden Transcripts. Yale University Press, 1990. 1-16. Print.

    Rose, Tricia. “Hip-Hop Wars: What We Talk about When We Talk about Hip-Hop-and Why it Matters”. Just Keeping It Real. New York, NY: Basic Books, 2008. 133-147. Print.

  3. 1) “the open interaction between subordinates and those who dominate” (2) “talking openly about undesirable or hard to hear truths about black urban street life” (134).
    “the … interaction between subordinates and those who dominate”(2)
    “[they are] talking openly about [the] undesirable [and] hard to hear truths about black urban street life”
    2) “discourse that takes place ‘offstage’, beyond direct observation of power holders” (4).
    “this public outrage against lyrics expressing anger at what was perceived as unjust authority had the potential to reduce sales since distributors were being pressured not to carry such records in their stores” (144).
    In the words of Scott, hidden transcript is “discourse that takes place ‘offstage’ beyond direct observation of power holders”
    Rose argues that “this public outrage against lyrics expressing anger at what was perceived as unjust authority had the potential to reduce sales since distributors were being pressured not to carry such records in their stores”
    3) 3)Before- “the open interaction between subordinates and those who dominate” (2) “
    After- “the open interaction between subordinates and those who dominate” (Scott 2)
    Before- “talking openly about undesirable or hard to hear truths about black urban street life” (134).
    After- “talking openly about undesirable or hard to hear truths about black urban street life” (Rose 134).
    Before- discourse that takes place ‘offstage’, beyond direct observation of power holders”(4)
    After- “discourse that takes place ‘offstage’, beyond direct observation of power holders”(Scott 4)
    Before- “this public outrage against lyrics expressing anger at what was perceived as unjust authority had the potential to reduce sales since distributors were being pressured not to carry such records in their stores” (144).
    After “this public outrage against lyrics expressing anger at what was perceived as unjust authority had the potential to reduce sales since distributors were being pressured not to carry such records in their stores” (Rose 144).
    4) Scott explaining how domination can take place passively.
    “Situations of domination produce a public transcript in close conformity with how the dominant group would wish to have things appear. The dominant never control the stage absolutely but their wishes normally prevail” (4).
    I changed the margins in order to close the quote together and then I added a beginning sentence to introduce the quote.
    5) They both follow number 16, Basic format for a book. They both fit in this category because both authors made a book of this.
    Scott, James. Domination and the Arts of Resistance: Hidden transcripts. New Haven: Yale UP, 1990. Print.
    Rose, Tricia. The Hip Hop Wars: What We Talk about When we Talk About Hip Hop- and Why it Matter. New York: Basic Civitas, 2008. Print

  4. 1.
    “One of the most common claims heard among rappers, their corporate managers, and fans of rap music is the idea that hip hop/rap is “just keeping it real” says writer Tricia Rose.

    Rewrite: “One of the most common claims heard among rappers…. and fans of rap music is the idea that hip hop/rap is “just keeping it real” says writer Tricia Rose.

    “is produced for a different audience and under different constraints of power than the public transcript” (Scott 5).

    Rewrite: “[The hidden transcript] is produced for a different audience and under different constraints of power than the public transcript” (Scott 5).

    These tools help the reader understand the quotes more efficiently because it either shortens them or allows us to add our own words in to make the meaning clearer.

    2.
    Scott says on page 10, “if the weak have obvious and compelling reasons to seek refuge behind a mask when in the presence of power, the powerful have their own compelling reasons for adopting a mask in the presence of subordinates.”

    Rewrite: On page 10, Scott reasons that “if the weak have obvious and compelling reasons to seek refuge behind a mask when in the presence of power, the powerful have their own compelling reasons for adopting a mask in the presence of subordinates.”

    The hidden transcript of rap is “produced for a different audience and under different constraints of power than the public transcript” (Scott 5).

    Rewrite: Scott emphasizes that the the hidden transcript of rap is “produced for a different audience and under different constraints of power than the public transcript” (Scott 5).

    3.
    One of the most common claims heard among rappers…. and fans of rap music is the idea that hip hop/rap is “just keeping it real” says writer Tricia Rose (134).

    “[The hidden transcript] is produced for a different audience and under different constraints of power than the public transcript” (Scott 5).

    Scott reasons that “if the weak have obvious and compelling reasons to seek refuge behind a mask when in the presence of power, the powerful have their own compelling reasons for adopting a mask in the presence of subordinates” (10).

    Scott emphasizes that the the hidden transcript of rap is “produced for a different audience and under different constraints of power than the public transcript” (5).

    You might not use a signal phase sometimes if it makes your sentence sound too repetitive or cluttered.

    4.
    “…hip hop in the mid-1990s, about youth rage directed at police and racism, generated a great deal of real social pressure that eventually shut down the commercial promotion of stories that included references to killing cops or contained strong social critique” (Rose 144).

    Rose examines the roles of hip hop on social pressure:
    (Indent) Previous versions of the “keeping it real” stories found in hip hop in the mid-1990s, about youth rage directed at police and racism, generated a great deal of real social pressure that eventually shut down the commercial promotion of stories that included references to killing cops or contained strong social critique (144).

    To change it I had to take out the quotation marks and introduce the quote with a sentence and a colon.I then had to indent the entire quote because it was more than four lines long, and then put the page number at the end.

    5. Both Rose and Scott are single authors of a printed book.

    Rose, Tricia. The Hip Hop Wars: What We Talk about When We Talk about Hip Hop–and Why It Matters. New York: Basic Civitas, 2008. Print.

    Scott, James C. Domination and the Arts of Resistance: Hidden Transcripts. New Haven: Yale UP, 1990. Print.

  5. 1. Before: She believes that “if radio- and television- promoted hip hop were really keeping it real-even in its portrayal of this narrow slice of black urban ghetto life- the perspectives on black street culture in commercial hip hop would be far more diverse” (Rose, 139).
    After: She believes that “if radio- and television- promoted hip hop were really keeping it real…the perspectives on black street culture in commercial hip hop would be far more diverse” (Rose, 139).
    Before: Corporate producers were concerned because their sales were lower because “distributors were being pressured not to carry such records in their stores” (Rose, 144).
    After: Corporate producers were concerned because their sales were lower because “distributors were being pressured [to stop carrying these] records in their stores” (Rose, 144).

    Elipses and brackets are both used to shorten lengthy quotes and they help make them concise and more clear for the reader.

    2. Before: Apparently those stories and “that sort of truth telling was apparently keeping it too real” (Rose, 144).
    After: Rose disputes that apparently those stories and “that sort of truth telling was apparently keeping it too real” (Rose, 144).
    Before: Scott believes that, “the hidden transcript is produced for a different audience and under different constraints of power than by the public transcript” (Scott, 5).
    After: Scott contends that, “the hidden transcript is produced for a different audience and under different constraints of power than by the public transcript” (Scott, 5).

    3. Revision of 3 sentences:

    She believes that “if radio- and television- promoted hip hop were really keeping it real…the perspectives on black street culture in commercial hip hop would be far more diverse” (Rose 139).

    Corporate producers were concerned because their sales were lower because “distributors were being pressured [to stop carrying these] records in their stores” (Rose 144).

    Rose disputes that apparently those stories and “that sort of truth telling was apparently keeping it too real” (144).

    Scott contends that, “the hidden transcript is produced for a different audience and under different constraints of power than by the public transcript” (5).

    Sometimes it is good not to use a signal phrase because if you have already explained the quote or spoke about the author in a sentence leading up to the quote then the signal phrase becomes repetitive.

    4. Before: The answer to the reason as to why these themes are not presented in hip hop is that, “hip hop in the mid-1990s” (Rose, 144) was “about youth rage directed at police and racism” (Rose, 144).
    After: Rose acknowledges that;
    (Indent) Previous versions of the “keeping it real” stories found in hip hop in the mid-1990s, about youth rage directed at police and racism, generated a great deal of real social pressures that eventually shut down the commercial promotion of stories that included references to killing cops or contained strong social critique. (144)

    I had to change some of the elements of the citation because I took out the quotation marks. Also, I used a colon and indented the entire quote because it is longer than a few lines. I took out Rose’s name in the citation and the page number goes after the period rather than before, like it does in normal citations.

    5. Both the texts we are working with are single author texts that are both books.

    Scott, James. “Behind the Official Story.”Domination and The Arts of Resistance: Hidden Transcripts. Yale University Press, 1990. 1-16. Print.

    Rose, Tricia. “Hip-Hop Wars: What We Talk about When We Talk about Hip-Hop-and Why it Matters”. Just Keeping It Real. New York, NY: Basic Books, 2008. 133-147. Print.

  6. 1. Rose states in her text “more often than not, the claim that hip-hop is just keeping it real is usually made in response to criticism that hip-hop lyrics are contributing to negative social conditions: encouraging violence, representing the criminal life, supporting sexism and homophobia.” So, the primary use of the “keeping it real” defense of hip-hop is to prove hip-hop’s role as a truth teller, especially the truths about poor, black, urban life that many people want to shove under the rug”(Rose, 134).
    Re-write: Rose believes that, “more often than not, the claim that hip-hop is just keeping it real is usually made in response to criticism that hip-hop lyrics are contributing to negative social conditions: encouraging violence, representing the criminal life, supporting sexism and homophobia.” So, the primary use of the “keeping it real” defense of hip-hop is to prove hip-hop’s role as a truth teller, especially the truths about poor, black, urban life that many people want to shove under the rug”(Rose, 134).
    2. Scott states “ the hidden transcript is thus derivative in the sense that it consists of those offstage speeches, gestures, and practices that confirm, contradict, or reflect what appears in the public transcript”(Scott, 4,5).
    Re-write: On page 4 and 5 James Scott reason that “ the hidden transcript is thus derivative in the sense that it consists of those offstage speeches, gestures, and practices that confirm, contradict, or reflect what appears in the public transcript”
    4. “ They want to sell records and thus they promote, tailor encourage, discourage, sign, and release artists based on two crucial factors: what they think will sell as many copies as possible and what they think won’t cause too much negative attention, friction, or resistance from society and government”(Rose, 143)
    Re-write: Roses reasoning and proof is that, “ they want to sell records and thus they promote, tailor encourage, discourage, sign, and release artists based on two crucial factors: what they think will sell as many copies as possible and what they think won’t cause too much negative attention, friction, or resistance from society and government”(Rose, 143)
    5. Both have written books
    Rose, Tricia. The Hip Hop Wars: What We Talk about When We Talk about Hip Hop–and Why It Matters. New York: Basic Civitas, 2008. Print.Scott, James C. Domination and the Arts of Resistance: Hidden Transcripts. New Haven: Yale UP, 1990. Print.

  7. 1. Hip hop can reveal powerful stories about living the thug-life, hustling, hoes and pimps.
    Rewrite: Hip hop can reveal powerful stories about,”…drug dealing, hustling, gang-banging, hoes and pimping,” (Rose 135).
    A public transcript is molded to the expectations of those in power.
    Rewrite: “…[A] public transcript [is] in close conformity with how the dominant group would wish to have things appear,” (Scott 4).
    These tools allow me to integrate the part of the quote that I feel is bring my point across most easily while also making it grammatically correct and easy to read.

    Signal phrasing enables us to weave our work with others’ texts into our papers. It helps introduce others’ ideas or information, and helps the reader know what’s coming.

    Find two quotes in your draft. Make sure one comes from each author we’re working with. Write the quotes.
    Now, revise each quote to include effective signal phrasing. (Our Templates can also help.)

    2. Songs like what Rose wants to hear are on the artist’s albums but rarely make it to the public through radio.
    Rewrite: Rose claims that,”…marketable artists have songs on their albums that move beyond the caricatures of the gangsta-pimp-ho trinity,…-despite their lyrical creativity and infectious beats- never see the light of radio play…,” (140).
    I did not use to much of Scott in my paper but in part of my revising I would put a sentence such as: According to Scott,”Many, perhaps most, hidden transcripts remain just that: hidden from the public view and never ‘enacted’.” (16).

    4. Rose starts to ask the many questions about where are the real things that artists should be rapping about:
    Where are the conversations about terrorizing acts of violence against men that are commonplace in prison life? Where are the stories about women who work two and three jobs to keep their children fed while hundreds of thousands of black father languish in American prisons? Where is the outrage about white racism and the anger and frustration about police brutality, economic isolation, and unemployment that define too much of black ghetto life? Is this not keeping it real? (139-140)
    5. We are using single author written books.
    Rose, Tricia. The Hip Hop Wars:What We Talk about When We Talk about Hip Hop-and Why It Matters. New York: Basic Civitas, 2008. Print.
    Scott, James. Domination & The Arts of Resistance: Hidden Transcripts. New Haven: Yale University, 1900. Print.

  8. 1.
    -“Consider Ludacris’s number –one-selling single, “Runaway Love,” which tells the story of young girls’ particular kind of suffering and vulnerability to domestic violence and sexual abuse. In one verse, he raps about a young girl who runs away because her drug-addicted mother refuses to believe that one of the men she brings over is sexually abusing her daughter… Ludacris appeared at the 2007 Grammy Awards presentation for winning Best Rap Album and Best Rap Song for “Money Maker” (a song encouraging a woman to shake her body “like somebody’s bout to pay ya.”) (Rose)
    -“The offstage transcript of elites is, like its counterpart among subordinates, derivative: it consists in those gestures and words that inflect, contradict, or confirm what appears in the public transcript.” (Scott)
    After…
    -“Consider Ludacris’s number –one-selling single, “Runaway Love,” which tells the story of young girls’ particular kind of suffering and vulnerability to domestic violence and sexual abuse . . . Ludacris appeared at the 2007 Grammy Awards presentation for winning Best Rap Album and Best Rap Song for “Money Maker” (a song encouraging a woman to shake her body “like somebody’s bout to pay ya.”) (Rose)
    -“The offstage transcript of elites is, like its counterpart [The Public Transcript] among subordinates, derivative: it consists in those gestures and words that inflect, contradict, or confirm what appears in the public transcript.” (Scott)

    2.
    - “Black community street-based criminal lifestyle: drug dealing, hustling, gang-banging, hoes, and pimping.” (Rose)
    - “The offstage transcript of elites is, like its counterpart among subordinates, derivative: it consists in those gestures and words that inflect, contradict, or confirm what appears in the public transcript.” (Scott)
    After…
    - Trisha Rose says that this music promotes, “Black community street-based criminal lifestyle: drug dealing, hustling, gang-banging, hoes, and pimping.”
    - Scott explains this perfectly, referring to the hidden transcript as an offstage transcript, “The offstage transcript of elites is, like its counterpart among subordinates, derivative: it consists in those gestures and words that inflect, contradict, or confirm what appears in the public transcript.”

    3.
    –“Consider Ludacris’s number –one-selling single, “Runaway Love,” which tells the story of young girls’ particular kind of suffering and vulnerability to domestic violence and sexual abuse . . . Ludacris appeared at the 2007 Grammy Awards presentation for winning Best Rap Album and Best Rap Song for “Money Maker” (a song encouraging a woman to shake her body “like somebody’s bout to pay ya”) (Rose 141).
    “The offstage transcript of elites is, like its counterpart [The Public Transcript] among subordinates, derivative: it consists in those gestures and words that inflect, contradict, or confirm what appears in the public transcript” (Scott 10).
    “Black community street-based criminal lifestyle: drug dealing, hustling, gang-banging, hoes, and pimping” (Rose 135).
    - If they were telling these stories so that kids would have an escape, something to relate to when they’re going through a rough time but, “The commercially promoted depiction of this aspect of street life as stylized, fun, and cool doesn’t just reflect the destruction aspect; it energizes, elevates, and promotes it.”
    Maybe I wouldn’t have to cite because my entire paragraph before this quote was about what rose is saying and this is just further backing my ideas up with hers
    4. -“Consider Ludacris’s number –one-selling single, “Runaway Love,” which tells the story of young girls’ particular kind of suffering and vulnerability to domestic violence and sexual abuse. In one verse, he raps about a young girl who runs away because her drug-addicted mother refuses to believe that one of the men she brings over is sexually abusing her daughter… Ludacris appeared at the 2007 Grammy Awards presentation for winning Best Rap Album and Best Rap Song for “Money Maker” (a song encouraging a woman to shake her body “like somebody’s bout to pay ya.”) (Rose)
    Although i can’t do it in this comment, when you use a quote that is longer than 4 lines we set off the quotation by indenting it 1 inche into the margin, removing quotations, and putting the period after the sentances not after the citation.
    5. We are working with books with a title in it’s title. Because they have a title and then they have the semi colon: and then there is another title after kind of deal.
    Rose, T. (2008). The Hip Hop Wars. Perseus Books Group, New York.
    Scott, J. (1992). Domination and the Arts of Resistance. Yale University Press.

  9. 1-
    Before-“Tupac Shakur understood this dynamic and worried about how his attempt to tell compelling stories to and for an already existing criminally involved subculture might encourage other kids to join the fold- or at least to emulate the style and attitude associated with it.”(142).

    After- “Tupac Shakur understood this dynamic and worried about how his attempt to tell compelling … might encourage other kids to join the fold- or at least to emulate the style and attitude associated with it.”(142).

    Before- “When the rage and frustration threatened government authority, corporations feared they’d be regulated and would lose money, and thus backed away, steering artist elsewhere” (144).

    After- “When the rage and frustration threatened government authority, corporations feared they’d be regulated and would lose money, and thus backed away, steering artist elsewhere [toward their public transcript]” (144).

    2-
    Before- according to Rose, “recently hip hop-inflected crooner Akon, have lost credibility not because they lack talent but because they were discovered to be telling lies about their criminal past or origins in “the ‘hood.”(136).

    After- Rose points out that “recently hip hop-inflected crooner Akon, have lost credibility not because they lack talent but because they were discovered to be telling lies about their criminal past or origins in “the ‘hood.”(136).

    Before- Rose said, “Tupac Shakur understood this dynamic and worried about how his attempt to tell compelling stories to and for an already existing criminally involved subculture might encourage other kids to join the fold- or at least to emulate the style and attitude associated with it.”(142).
    After- Rose mentioned Tupac to support her claim by, -“Tupac Shakur understood this dynamic and worried about how his attempt to tell compelling stories to and for an already existing criminally involved subculture might encourage other kids to join the fold- or at least to emulate the style and attitude associated with it.”(142).

    3-
    Before- Rose said, “Tupac Shakur understood this dynamic and worried about how his attempt to tell compelling stories to and for an already existing criminally involved subculture might encourage other kids to join the fold- or at least to emulate the style and attitude associated with it.”(142).

    After- “Tupac Shakur understood this dynamic and worried about how his attempt to tell compelling stories to and for an already existing criminally involved subculture might encourage other kids to join the fold- or at least to emulate the style and attitude associated with it.”(Rose 142).

    Before- according to Rose, “recently hip hop-inflected crooner Akon, have lost credibility not because they lack talent but because they were discovered to be telling lies about their criminal past or origins in “the ‘hood.”(Rose 136).

    After- according to Rose, “recently hip hop-inflected crooner Akon, have lost credibility not because they lack talent but because they were discovered to be telling lies about their criminal past or origins in “the ‘hood.”(136).

    Before- “When the rage and frustration threatened government authority, corporations feared they’d be regulated and would lose money, and thus backed away, steering artist elsewhere [toward their public transcript]” (144).

    After- “When the rage and frustration threatened government authority, corporations feared they’d be regulated and would lose money, and thus backed away, steering artist elsewhere [toward their public transcript]” (Rose 144).

    4-
    “recently hip hop-inflected crooner Akon, have lost credibility not because they lack talent but because they were discovered to be telling lies about their criminal past or origins in “the ‘hood.”(136).
    To extend this quote I would need to add and introduction to the quote. I would also add and explanation of the quote afterward.

    5-
    Both text that we used only had one author for each book.
    Scott, James. “Behind the Official Story.”Domination and The Arts of Resistance: Hidden Transcripts. Yale University Press, 1990. 1-16. Print.
    Rose, Tricia. “Hip-Hop Wars: What We Talk about When We Talk about Hip-Hop-and Why it Matters”. Just Keeping It Real. New York, NY: Basic Books, 2008. 133-147. Print.

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