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My New Rack

Surfboard Rack image.
My new 8 Board Rack, mounted in the surf shed and partially loaded.

It was time. Boards were getting stacked in corners, bungie corded to walls, or worse.

Surfboards in a heap image.
What the... Men down!

I love my first rack. It holds 6 boards, is made of wood, and has a gorgeous blue paint job. I made it in just a few hours.

But it had a problem: The dowels were horizontal, and my yard squirrels were a serious threat to the quiver. The photo to the right shows what I found one morning when I forgot to attach my "locking strap" to the rack. My Weber Performer had a 2" gash all the way into the foam. I never forgot to secure the strap after that day.

I settled on an 8-board rack that put the boards on an angle that offered more piece of mind than my 6-board rack. Over three weeks and a bit a time, I created an expanded, improved re-make of the original rack.

Photo of new board rack in process.
New and improved - in process.

It's massive. I've spaced the dowels 12" apart to accommodate the big 'ole fins on my logs. The dowels are a bit beefier than the original, which is overkill without being inelegant. And the finished product is a very similar blue to the original. I think of it as a taller, stronger, and handsomer version of Surfboard Rack 1.0.

New surf rack image - installed.
Loading up Surfboard Rack 2.0. (Yes, I added a restraining strap for added security.)

This rack holds 8 boards - longboards. It's fully loaded now, but the above photo shows just 6 of the boards in it. From top: DC Sam ('60s pig); Hanlon Straws Noserider (classic style and custom); Trimcraft Haley Pin (midlength); Dewey Weber Legend (a very early Walker-foam model); Bing Lotus (transition era midlength); Hilbers Fineline "Golden Girl" ('50s pig). I need a stool to get a board on or off the top shelf, but that's ok.