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After waiting all summer to sell our house so we could hold a yard sale, we decided to have the sale even though the house hasn't sold. Emma came up with the idea of a lemonade stand, and she added iced tea to the menu. She sat out front all day selling lemonade to people who came to the yard sale, to the mailman, and to passers by. I think she made almost $20 over about 6 hours. (That's more than I made in 6 hours when I started flipping burgers at 16!)

At the end of the day, I pulled out my phone and shot some video of the kids pitching lemonade. Today I pulled the video off my phone, imported it into iMovie, added a filter to give it an old movie look, and put a piece of the video on my Youtube account.

[Video deleted at Emma's request - February 22, 2013]

You'll notice that Emma isn't offering more than unpaid internships at her stand! Too bad for her brothers.

I just completed the "rough" migration of my website into WordPress 3.0. I'm wrapping the weblog and the pages all in one blog. I'll post the procedures once I finish tying up all the (very) loose ends on the project. For example, I just realized that I deleted the files that were controlling my CSS-switching experiment, a 4-5 year effort that I'd hate to lose just because I'm moving to WordPress for the site. Repairing the damage will take a little time. (Major ouch!)

What's good about this move?

  • I get Web 2.0 functionality and the database web moving forward.
  • My weblog is integrated with the rest of my site.
  • With WordPress 3.0 I can roll multiple sites/blogs into a single install, and manage them from one admin panel.
  • This enables me to move all my course sites into WordPress (going forward). I experimented with WP-driven course sites in Spring 2010 and I mostly liked it.

What's not good?

  • My focus on content migration took my eye off design. I have a "designed" site, to be sure. But it has a very bloggy (or blocky?) look/feel to it.  In time I'll push this issue, starting with experiments in course website.
  • Lots of up front work to move things.
  • Errors will be huge. (Let's hope I don't err.)