Syllabus

  • Course: LIL 120 A (Introductory Arts and Humanities Seminar)
  • Instructor: Michael J. Cripps, Ph.D.
  • Meeting Days/Rooms
    • Monday and Thursday: 12:30-1:50PM (Marcil 217AB)
    • Individual Conferences (TBA)
  • Office Hours (Marcil 116, English Suite)
    • Monday and Thursday, 11-12PM
    • Also, By Appointment (please ask!)

COURSE DESCRIPTION

The Introductory Arts and Humanities Seminar introduces students to questions about the place of the arts, humanities, and communication in a life well lived, in the university, and in the broader society. How do we make sense of the world through art and literature? How does familiarity with history help us place current events in a meaningful context? What concepts and terms do we use to arrive at our moral, ethical, aesthetic, and religious values? How might we communicate that meaning and those concerns to others in oral, written, and visual ways? Students participate in small group work, regular reading and writing, engaging discussions, and campus events. Over the term, they develop an academic ePortfolio, where they collect, select, and reflect on their learning. Throughout the class, students work closely with faculty and peers to critically examine the place of the liberal arts in higher education, relate their own goals to the curriculum, and become active participants in the School of Arts and Humanities.  3.000 Credit hours.

This course meets a major requirement (elective) for students majoring in Art & Design Media, Art Education, Communications, English, History, and Interdisciplinary Studies in the Humanities.

A Note on Instruction: This seminar-style class has a single instructor but takes advantage of the fact that it is an introductory course within the School of Arts and Humanities by bringing other faculty from a range of disciplines into class as seminar discussion facilitators. As your peers come from a range of programs within the school, so will the faculty.

WORKLOAD EXPECTATIONS IN COLLEGE COURSES

Most first year students are taken aback by the quantity of work required in courses. Please know that the quantity is required for the school to be accredited. According to the US Department of Education, a college credit requires student work that “reasonably approximates not less than one hour of class and two hours of out-of-class student work per week.” For a 3-credit course, that’s an average of 9 hours per week of in- and out-of-class work.

Professor Cripps will help you budget time by identifying expected “time on task” for regular assignments/activities.


Grading

This is a seminar class that privileges daily preparation and engagement. More than half the grade is about work you bring each day (homework, activities, participation in discussion). Much of life is about showing up, taking chances, and bringing our best selves. We have three “major” projects, but each is only worth 10%. And there’s our semester-long ePortfolio project.

  • 15% – Daily Reading/Writing (informal) – Printed & added to ePortfolio
  • 15% – Attendance/Participation, including Post-class reflections (5-10 minutes) at end of class to reflect/take stock of the day’s learning.
  • 15% – Beyond Class activity engagement – 2 academic events; 2 extracurricular events; 2 other.
  • 10% – Weekly Audio Journal Entries (weekly audio or video logs on the college transition). This lays the groundwork for our final project by providing media that can be interpreted/shaped to tell a story.
  • 10% – Major Project 1 (Goal Setting & the Liberal Arts)
  • 10% – Major Project 2 (Major Exploration Project)
  • 10% – Major Project 3 (College Story Podcast – or other digital storytelling medium)
  • 15% – ePortfolio

A note on grading in the class: One contemporary, equitable approach to grading in college courses is known as labor-based grading. Related to that approach, in my own practice, is specifications grading. I bring these two approaches together in a points-accumulation grading model: Do the work, earn the points; Meet specific specifications, earn the points. What does this mean for you?

  • If you do the activity, I offer full credit. (Do the Reading/Writing Assignment, earn full points.) Easy. Don’t do it, earn no credit. (This is the “labor” or work of the course.) I apply this approach to ALL PARTS of the course.
  • Specifications come more clearly into focus with the Major Projects and the ePortfolio, where I will identify the components or elements of a project and award points based on your attempt at those components. (We’ll discuss this as we get into the class.)

Final Grade Range

  • A = 93-100
  • A- = 90-92
  • B+ = 87-89
  • B = 83-86
  • B- = 80-82
  • C+ = 77-79
  • C = 73-76
  • C- = 70-72
  • D = 60-69
  • F = <60
  • I = Nearly all work completed
  • W = Withdrawal during first two-thirds of the term
  • WP = Withdrawal while passing after first two-thirds of the term
  • WF = Withdrawal while failing after first two-thirds of the term

Midterm Academic Progress Reports

The University of New England is committed to the academic success of its students.  At the midterm of each semester, instructors will report the performance of each student as SATISFACTORY (S) or UNSATISFACTORY (U).  Instructors will announce when these midterm academic progress reports will be available for viewing via U-online.  This early alert system gives all students important information about progress in their courses. Students who receive an UNSATISFACTORY midterm report should take immediate action by speaking with their instructor to discuss suggestions for improvement such as utilizing the services of academic advising, the Student Academic Success Center, Counseling Services, and Residential Education.

Inclusivity Statement 

UNE’s Core Values Statement acknowledges “the benefits of a richly varied campus community arise not only from the diversity of its people but also from a sense of belonging” (see Mission, Vision, and Values). The classroom should provide a space for learning, dialogue, and action that promotes the full engagement of students from all backgrounds. Instructors and students will strive to create a respectful and supportive environment for collaboration, empathy, and the building of meaningful relationships.  

To help achieve an inclusive learning environment: 

  • If your name (or associated pronouns) differs from the roster, please let the instructor know. 
  • If you anticipate needing to miss or shift class responsibilities due to a religious observance, please let the instructor know.  
  • If you experience an unwelcoming environment in the classroom or on campus (for example, in response to the representation of differences in the course or you believe biases may be affecting your academic experience), please reach out to the instructor, a trusted faculty mentor, or your academic advisor for guidance on next steps.  
  • If you experience any form of discrimination in the classroom or on campus, contact the Title IX and Office of Civil Rights Coordinator: Ms. Angela Shambarger (ashambarger@une.edu) or the Dean of Students: Ms. Jennifer DeBurro (jdeburro@une.edu). Please note: Faculty are mandatory reporters; should you disclose sexual assault or related forms of abuse, instructors are required to notify other campus entities. 
  • To submit a Title IX, Bias, or Harassment Complaint: https://une-advocate.symplicity.com/titleix_report/index.php/pid059472? 

To report incidents: https://www.une.edu/concern 

Attendance Policy

In alignment with the University Attendance Policy, all students are expected to attend all classes for which they are registered and to hand all assignments in on time. Absences due to religious observances and scheduled varsity intercollegiate competition are necessarily excused. Additional absences may be excused at the discretion of the instructor and some form of documentation may be required. Details regarding course-specific attendance policies are at the discretion of the instructor and included in the course syllabus (below).

Students who are absent from class should:

  •  communicate in advance (whenever possible) the details of any absence to their faculty and other university-wide reporting mechanisms as applicable;
  • engage in meaningful follow-up with the instructor to make up any missed work in a timely manner, as agreed upon by the instructor, and;
  • adhere to specific attendance/absence policies as included in the course syllabus.

As it is inequitable for non-athletes and the non-religious when we “necessarily” excuse absences for athletic competitions or religious observances, we will expand our absence policy in the following ways:

  • Students earn “points” for attending class.
  • Students receive four “necessarily” excused absences. We will call these attendance freebies. This applies to athletes, the religious, those who get called to work or have childcare responsibilities, etc.
  • After those four freebies are exhausted, absences negatively impact one’s grade.
  • Unused Freebies will be applied to attendance in the form of bonus points.

This policy establishes greater equity between athletes, the religious, those with children, those who work, etc. It penalizes NOBODY in that it is possible to earn 100% attendance while still missing four class meetings.

Students must still submit homework due on a missed class day on time in order to earn the daily reading/writing points. This policy is in alignment with the UNE attendance policy. (We also have a 4 “no homework” passes policy to acknowledge that we can’t always bring our A Game.)

Students who will have extended absences from their academics (> 3 days) should report their absence using the following form: https://forms.office.com/r/SdYwNNARBG. It aids in communicating extended absences to those who support student success.

Midterm Academic Progress Reports

The University of New England is committed to the academic success of its students.  At the midterm of each semester, instructors will report the performance of each student as SATISFACTORY (S) or UNSATISFACTORY (U).  Instructors will announce when these midterm academic progress reports will be available for viewing via U-online.  This early alert system gives all students important information about progress in their courses. Students who receive an UNSATISFACTORY midterm report should take immediate action by speaking with their instructor to discuss suggestions for improvement such as utilizing the services of academic advising, the Student Academic Success Center, Counseling Services, and Residential Education.

Student Academic Success Center (SASC)

The Student Academic Success Center offers a range of free services to support your academic achievement, including tutoring, writing support, digital project support for ePortfolio, test-prep and studying strategies, learning consultations, and many online resources. To see and schedule available appointments go to https://une.tutortrac.com or visit the SASC. To access our online resources, including links, guides, and video tutorials, visit https://une1.sharepoint.com/sites/SASC.

Students With Disabilities

The University of New England is committed to creating a learning environment that meets the needs of its diverse student body and will make reasonable accommodations for students with qualifieddisabilities. Any student eligible for and needing academic adjustments or accommodations because of a disability is encouraged to request accommodations through the UNE Student Access Center. Registration with the Student Access Center is required before accommodation requests can be granted. Visit https://www.une.edu/student-access-center for more information.

Student Well-being

If you find yourself struggling, please reach out and take advantage of the many campus resources available to you. For academic support, contact your instructor, professional advisor, faculty advisor, and/or the SASC. For physical or mental health concerns, the Student Health Center, Student Counseling Services, and wellness programming are available. For concerns about finances, contact Student Financial Services. There are lots of people to help; in addition to those named above, you can alwaystalk with your Area Coordinator, coach, club advisor, faith leader, or a friend. 

Academic Integrity

The UNE Student Handbook states:

The University of New England values academic integrity in all aspects of the educational experience. Academic misconduct in any form undermines this standard and devalues the original contributions of others. It is the responsibility of all members of the university community to actively uphold the integrity of the academy; failure to act, for any reason, is not acceptable.

Charges of academic misconduct will be reviewed by the Dean of the appropriate College and, if upheld, will result at minimum in a failing grade on the assignment and a maximum of dismissal from the University of New England. (UNE Student Handbook, 2021, p. 88).

Academic misconduct includes, but is not limited to:

1. Cheating, copying, or the offering or receiving of unauthorized assistance or information including but not limited to:

A. use of any unauthorized assistance in taking quizzes, tests, or examinations;

B. dependence upon the aid of sources beyond those authorized by the faculty in writing papers, preparing reports, solving problems, or carrying out other assignments, including but not limited to calculators, handheld computers, smart phones, or any other electronic devices or applications of any kind whatsoever; or

C. the acquisition, with or without permission, of tests or other academic materials belonging to a member of the University faculty or staff.

2. Fabrication or falsification of data, results, or sources for papers, reports, or examinations, either oral or written.

3. Actions that destroy or alter the work of another student.

4. Multiple submissions of the same paper or report for assignments in more than one course without permission of each instructor.

5. Plagiarism: the appropriation of records, research, materials, ideas, or the language of other persons or writers and the submission of them as one’s own including but not limited to:

A. the use, by paraphrase or direct quotation, of the published or unpublished work of another person without full and clear acknowledgment; or

B. the unacknowledged use of materials prepared by another person, c